Article: Healthy Habits for Agents

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Healthy Tips for a Real Estate Agent’s Mind, Body, and Soul

As real estate agents, we are creatures of promotion. It’s likely been hammered into us that in order to be our best, we need to look our best, sound our best and live our best. And that’s good advice. That being said, it’s easy to follow that advice to its most superficial ends; gaggles of men and women shilling fitness products and horrid detox teas on TV and social media are the living embodiment of this.

When it comes to being healthy, we’re in favor of a more holistic approach of a solid diet, proper sleep and exercise and a work-life balance that keeps us satisfied and sane. It’s easier said than done, we know.

RealVolve.com has a nice list of habits that can apply to anyone; we suggest giving it a read. Our takeaway was the statistics — healthy individuals on average earn 9 percent more than those who are not, while those who are technically obese earn 18 percent less than their peers. That has a lot to do with health and productivity. Other good advice includes getting sunlight (sorry, Seattle agents) and plenty of sleep.

Here are a few more tips from our experts that could help you in your day to day efforts to stay fit and healthy amid the madness.

 

Pack a cooler

If you spend as much time in your car as most agents, it’s tempting to eat drive-through for every meal. That, more than any other, is the surest way to pack on 20 pounds before the selling season is over.

Instead, pack a cooler every day or two with fresh fruit, lean lunchmeat (even those Lunchables prepackaged deals), whole grain snacks and nuts. Then, instead of fast-food tacos you can eat something a little more responsible (and, in the end, cheaper) and feel better about yourself. Your hunger level at the end of the day won’t be much different, and you won’t feel as guilty indulging in a heavier dinner or adding real half and half to your morning coffee — and don’t worry… we’d never suggest you give that up (though you might dial back from the large frozen frappe with whipped cream at some point).

Plan a bookend

When it comes to time management, it’s easy to let work take over. That’s why we suggest setting something at the beginning or the end of your day that you can’t get out of and forces you to schedule around. Dropping your kids off at school, a (paid) yoga class, a volunteering gig, a civic club meeting or just time with your significant other… all can provide boundaries on your work day and help you achieve more satisfaction with your schedule.
Walk when you can

If possible, schedule your appointments in blocks so instead of driving you can walk to appointments — this is particularly effective if you specialize in a certain neighborhood, or live in a city where walking and public transportation are more convenient than driving (helloo New York). This might require watching the weather and investing in a killer pair of flats, but it’ll be totally worth it when your calves are popping and you don’t feel obligated to spend an hour on the treadmill at the end of the day.

Organize your life

The state of your office and your car — sometimes they’re the same thing! — can contribute significantly to your mental well-being. Make decluttering your car and organizing your office a priority. Keep extra phone chargers handy. Take the time to set up your car’s Bluetooth calling system with your frequently used numbers. Place photos and items around your office that both make you happy and project the vibe you want to work in (a framed photo of a favorite team’s stadium, for example, look far better than a row of bobbleheads on the window sill). Cleanliness may be next to godliness, but we’ll settle for being able to find a pen or gum when we need it, thank you.
Take time for yourself

Even in the midst of a busy work day, look for five minute windows to listen to a favorite song, play a game on a favorite app, listen to an inspirational podcast, or meditate. If you’re habitually early (and you should be), those minutes while you wait on a client to show up are a very good place to start. And don’t answer your phone unless there’s money on the line — you’re already blocked off on the schedule. You can call them back.

These small moments can add up to an hour or more that you didn’t think you had, and your clients will appreciate you emerging from your car with a smile, rather than your phone plastered to your ear.